Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Breakthrough Technology Introduced to Combat Growing Global Water Crisis
DUNEDIN, FLA. - To combat the global threat of...
Blue Marble Geographics releases version 8.1 of the GeoCalc Software Development Kit
Hallowell, Maine  — Blue Marble Geographics® (bluemarblegeo.com) is pleased to announce...
Fugro finishes first phase on Alcatel Submarine Networks’ transpacific Bifrost Cable System
Fugro has completed the first phase of its marine...
Paytronix Announces Integration with Google to enable ordering on Google Search and Maps
Newton, MA– Paytronix Systems, Inc., the most advanced digital guest experience platform, today announced...
USAF, Kratos Complete Milestone 1 of the Autonomous Attritable Aircraft Experimentation (AAAx) Campaign with Successful Flight Test Series
SAN DIEGO - Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, Inc. (NASDAQ:...

Click on image to enlarge.

Snow-covered deserts are rare, but that’s exactly what the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on NASA’s Aqua satellite observed as it passed over the Taklimakan Desert in western China on Jan. 2, 2013.
The Taklimakan is one of the world’s largest—and hottest—sandy deserts. Water flowing into the Tarim Basin has no outlet, so over the years sediments have steadily accumulated. In parts of the desert, sand can pile up to 300 meters (roughly 1,000 feet) high. The mountains that enclose the sea of sand—the Tien Shan in the north and the Kunlun Shan in the south—were also covered with what appeared to be a significantly thicker layer of snow in January 2013.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.