Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Verus® Research Awarded U.S. Army Contract for Directed Energy System Placement Analysis Capability
Albuquerque, N.M. – Verus® Research, a New Mexico-based team...
Map of the Month: GfK Retail Purchasing Power, Germany 2021
GfK’s Map of the Month for December shows the...
Space Foundation Opens Registration for 37th Space Symposium, To Be Held April 4-7, 2022
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.  — Space Foundation, a nonprofit advocate...
UP42 Joins the BDI NewSpace Initiative on Its Mission to Foster the German Economy and Innovation
The Berlin-based geospatial start-up becomes an official member of...
Introducing TomTom IndiGO: The world’s first open digital cockpit software platform for carmakers
AMSTERDAM - TomTom (TOM2), the geolocation technology specialist, today...
saharan_scene

This sandy image of the Sahara, captured by Japan’s ALOS satellite, shows evidence of a wetter time.

Satellites provide the perfect way to capture images of the Sahara as well as to observe and monitor such barren and hostile landscapes, where the heat and lack of water make them unwelcome to other means of measurement.

In this image, a large area of rock appearing purple stretches across the right side of the image, with fluvial erosion patterns testament to an earlier time when the area received more rainfall. Today, this area sees an average of about 10 mm of rainfall per year.

Japan’s ALOS satellite recorded this image on Jan. 28, 2011, and it’s being shared by the European Space Agency. The agency uses its multimission ground systems to acquire, process, distribute and archive data from the satellite.

The desolate nature of deserts, with constantly changing dunes due to wind, provide striking images of areas not favorable to human habitation.

Read the full story here.

Comments are closed.

  • Nov 18, 2014
  • Comments Off on Sharing a Sandy Saharan Scene
  • Uncategorized
  • 1479 Views
saharan_scene

This sandy image of the Sahara, captured by Japan’s ALOS satellite, shows evidence of a wetter time.

Satellites provide the perfect way to capture images of the Sahara as well as to observe and monitor such barren and hostile landscapes, where the heat and lack of water make them unwelcome to other means of measurement.

In this image, a large area of rock appearing purple stretches across the right side of the image, with fluvial erosion patterns testament to an earlier time when the area received more rainfall. Today, this area sees an average of about 10 mm of rainfall per year.

Japan’s ALOS satellite recorded this image on Jan. 28, 2011, and it’s being shared by the European Space Agency. The agency uses its multimission ground systems to acquire, process, distribute and archive data from the satellite.

The desolate nature of deserts, with constantly changing dunes due to wind, provide striking images of areas not favorable to human habitation.

Read the full story here.

Comments are closed.