Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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aralsea_2000

The Aral Sea in 2000 included a large eastern lobe and a smaller western lobe that connected at the north and south ends.

In 2014, the eastern lobe completely dried up, leaving a fraction of what was once the world’s fourth largest lake.

What was once the world’s fourth largest lake, the Aral Sea has been the victim of a major water diversion project undertaken in the 1960s and is now a polluted puddle compared with its former self. The diversion has irrigated the plains of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, but has cut off the waters of the Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers to slowly shrink the lake, which has been clogged by sediment and polluted by fertilizers and pesticides.

NASA compiled a time-lapse series of images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the agency’s Terra satellite that shows how the lake has shrunk from 2000 through 2014. This summer marked the final drying point of the eastern lobe of the Southern Aral Sea.

Over the years there have been efforts to slow the lake’s disappearance, but without its water source the levels have declined steadily, taking with it many communities that depended upon it for fishing and livelihoods.

Images courtesy of NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.

aralsea_2000

The Aral Sea in 2000 included a large eastern lobe and a smaller western lobe that connected at the north and south ends.

In 2014, the eastern lobe completely dried up, leaving a fraction of what was once the world’s fourth largest lake.

What was once the world’s fourth largest lake, the Aral Sea has been the victim of a major water diversion project undertaken in the 1960s and is now a polluted puddle compared with its former self. The diversion has irrigated the plains of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, but has cut off the waters of the Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers to slowly shrink the lake, which has been clogged by sediment and polluted by fertilizers and pesticides.

NASA compiled a time-lapse series of images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the agency’s Terra satellite that shows how the lake has shrunk from 2000 through 2014. This summer marked the final drying point of the eastern lobe of the Southern Aral Sea.

Over the years there have been efforts to slow the lake’s disappearance, but without its water source the levels have declined steadily, taking with it many communities that depended upon it for fishing and livelihoods.

Images courtesy of NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.