Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Developers Invited to Participate in the May 2021 OGC API Virtual Code Sprint
The next OGC Sprint will focus on further refining...
2021 ASPRS Annual Workshop Program
The American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing: The...
AccuWeather Partners with Microsoft to Bring New Capabilities to Microsoft Azure Maps
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - AccuWeather today announced the integration of...
Quanergy’s QORTEX 2.1 LiDAR Perception Software Brings Real-Time PTZ Camera Control Automation to Security, Smart Space, and Smart City Applications
SUNNYVALE, Calif. - Quanergy Systems, Inc., a leading provider...
D-Fend Solutions Offers Significantly Expanded Counter-Drone Coverage with a Multi-Sensor Command & Control Central Management Solution
RA'ANANA, Israel - D-Fend Solutions – the leader in counter-drone, radio frequency-based,...

Click on image to enlarge.

This photograph from the International Space Station highlights a late-summer “whiting event” visible across much of Lake Ontario. Such events commonly occur in late summer and are caused by changes in water temperature, which allows fine particles of calcium carbonate to form in the water column.

Lake Ontario—like the Great Lakes Erie, Huron and Superior—is roughly divided between the United States and Canada. The U.S. side of Lake Ontario has its shoreline in the state of New York, while its Canadian shoreline lies within the province of Ontario. The city of Kingston, Ontario, is visible near the Saint Lawrence River outflow from the lake. Several other landscape features of New York are visible in the image, including the Finger Lakes region to the west of Syracuse. To the northeast of Syracuse, the dark wooded slopes of the Adirondack Mountains are visible at image upper left. Patchy white cloud cover obscures much of the land surface to the west of Lake Ontario.

Image courtesy of NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.