Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Secure, reliable information from official national sources essential to functioning of modern state say geospatial experts
Trusted authoritative sources of spatial information are fundamental requirements...
Formerly known as EOS Vision, Aspectum Announces its New Revamped Geodata Analysis Algorithm
Menlo Park, CA  – Aspectum, a cloud-based ecosystem for...
Septentrio introduces a new GNSS/INS system in a rugged housing
Leuven, Belgium - Septentrio, a leading global supplier of...
Percepto at Smart Mining 2.0 to Demonstrate How Autonomous Drones are Transforming Mining Operations Around the World
Percepto, the global market leader for autonomous industrial drone...
Allen Wainger, PE Joins AXIS GeoSpatial LLC as Director of Program Management
Easton, Maryland - AXIS GeoSpatial LLC is pleased to...

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer sensor on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this natural-color image of the storm system at 2:40 p.m. Central Daylight Time, just minutes before the devastating twister began. The red line on the image depicts the tornado’s track.

On May 20, 2013, NASA’s Aqua satellite captured an image of a supercell thunderstorm just minutes before it spawned a destructive tornado that passed just south of Oklahoma City.

According to National Weather Service and media reports, the mile-wide tornado had a preliminary damage rating of EF-4, with winds reaching 190 miles per hour. It had a relatively slow forward speed for such a violent storm—about 20–25 miles per hour—likely exacerbating the damage. Debris from the tornado fell as far as 100 miles (160 kilometers) away, reaching the city of Tulsa.

Image courtesy of NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.