Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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Asnaro_1

An artist’s rendering shows the ASNARO-1 satellite. Japan hopes to grow its space industry with this small high-resolution satellite.

A Dnepr rocket carried five Japanese Earth observing satellites into orbit Nov. 6, 2014, from the Dombrovsky military base in southern Russia. The rocket was a modified R-36M Soviet-era ballistic missile that was decommissioned.

Aboard the rocket were five Earth observation satellites. 

• The Advanced Satellite with New System Architecture for Observation (ASNARO 1), a high-resolution satellite with half-meter resolution designed to send imagery back via an x-band radio system.
• The Hodoyoshi 1 medium-resolution Earth observation satellite developed by the University of Tokyo
• The ChubuSat 1 satellite with optical and infrared cameras to observe space debris developed by Nagoya University
• The Tsubame mission with a compact camera led by the Tokyo Institute of Technology
• The QSAT-EOS satellite with a mission to monitor disasters and vegetation developed by Kyushu University

The rocket was operated by Kosmotras, a Moscow-based company with joint Russian and Ukranian ownership.

Image courtesy of Japan Space Systems/METI.

Comments are closed.

Asnaro_1

An artist’s rendering shows the ASNARO-1 satellite. Japan hopes to grow its space industry with this small high-resolution satellite.

A Dnepr rocket carried five Japanese Earth observing satellites into orbit Nov. 6, 2014, from the Dombrovsky military base in southern Russia. The rocket was a modified R-36M Soviet-era ballistic missile that was decommissioned.

Aboard the rocket were five Earth observation satellites. 

• The Advanced Satellite with New System Architecture for Observation (ASNARO 1), a high-resolution satellite with half-meter resolution designed to send imagery back via an x-band radio system.
• The Hodoyoshi 1 medium-resolution Earth observation satellite developed by the University of Tokyo
• The ChubuSat 1 satellite with optical and infrared cameras to observe space debris developed by Nagoya University
• The Tsubame mission with a compact camera led by the Tokyo Institute of Technology
• The QSAT-EOS satellite with a mission to monitor disasters and vegetation developed by Kyushu University

The rocket was operated by Kosmotras, a Moscow-based company with joint Russian and Ukranian ownership.

Image courtesy of Japan Space Systems/METI.

Comments are closed.