Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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archaeology_photogrammetry

A new photogrammetry technique was used to map an excavation site of a possible Viking grave.

Archaeologists at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology recently deployed a new photogrammetry method to document their excavations. By mapping sites with photographs, the archaeologists save a lot of time and preserve such vital information as the location and relationships of found artifacts.

The method saves the use of tape measures and sketches, capturing more detail quickly. A model can be created automatically from capturing three or four photos from different angles with a common camera.

The research team suggests the next step is to share its models of excavation sites using 3-D glasses and virtual reality software. The team also intends to go through its digital archive to try to re-create digs from decades ago.

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