Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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Interpretation of DDM to windspeed

SSTL has worked with the U.K.’s National Oceanography Center to translate data from Delay Doppler Maps into an interpretation of wind speed measurements at the sea surface.

Using GNSS reflectometry, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) has demonstrated an innovative way to measure winds and waves from space. The measurements were taken from an instrument developed by SSTL, the Space GNSS Receiver Remote Sensing Instrument (SGR-ReSI), which is flying on-board the recently launched TechDemoSat-1 satellite.

SGR-ReSI collects signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) and other navigation satellites after they’ve been reflected off the ocean surface and processes them into images called Delay Doppler Maps. The maps can be used to interpret ocean roughness and wind speed measurements at the sea surface. The technique is similar to existing scatterometric radar from satellites, without the need for a transmitter. Four reflections from different GPS satellites can be processed simultaneously, presenting an opportunity for collecting data more regularly and in a denser grid across the globe.

“A constellation of 18 SGR-ReSIs could cover most of the world’s oceans every few hours, providing a real-time wind and wave height service,” said Luis Gomes, director of Earth Observation and Science at SSTL. “These do not need to be dedicated satellites, as the SGR-ReSI can be easily accommodated as a hosted payload. Our aim is to deploy such a constellation in the next two years.”

The SGR-ReSI can pick up GPS reflections off the ocean as well as land, snow and ice, opening new opportunities such as measuring the thickness of sea ice, measuring snow depth and soil moisture levels, and classifying vegetative foliage.

Image courtesy of SSTL.

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  • Oct 1, 2014
  • Comments Off on A New Method Measures Ocean Winds and Waves from Space
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Interpretation of DDM to windspeed

SSTL has worked with the U.K.’s National Oceanography Center to translate data from Delay Doppler Maps into an interpretation of wind speed measurements at the sea surface.

Using GNSS reflectometry, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) has demonstrated an innovative way to measure winds and waves from space. The measurements were taken from an instrument developed by SSTL, the Space GNSS Receiver Remote Sensing Instrument (SGR-ReSI), which is flying on-board the recently launched TechDemoSat-1 satellite.

SGR-ReSI collects signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) and other navigation satellites after they’ve been reflected off the ocean surface and processes them into images called Delay Doppler Maps. The maps can be used to interpret ocean roughness and wind speed measurements at the sea surface. The technique is similar to existing scatterometric radar from satellites, without the need for a transmitter. Four reflections from different GPS satellites can be processed simultaneously, presenting an opportunity for collecting data more regularly and in a denser grid across the globe.

“A constellation of 18 SGR-ReSIs could cover most of the world’s oceans every few hours, providing a real-time wind and wave height service,” said Luis Gomes, director of Earth Observation and Science at SSTL. “These do not need to be dedicated satellites, as the SGR-ReSI can be easily accommodated as a hosted payload. Our aim is to deploy such a constellation in the next two years.”

The SGR-ReSI can pick up GPS reflections off the ocean as well as land, snow and ice, opening new opportunities such as measuring the thickness of sea ice, measuring snow depth and soil moisture levels, and classifying vegetative foliage.

Image courtesy of SSTL.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.