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A USGS scientists operates a mobile Global Positioning System receiver to map a saltmarsh, one of many coastal ecosystems under pressure from climate change.

A USGS scientists operates a mobile Global Positioning System receiver to map a saltmarsh, one of many coastal ecosystems under pressure from climate change.

The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) recently announced 50 new research projects with universities and other partners, awarding nearly $6 million for inquiries into the effects of climate change and community preparedness.

"These climate studies are designed to help address regional concerns associated with climate change, providing a pathway to enhancing resilience and supporting local community needs," said U.S. Secretary of Interior Sally Jewell. "The impacts of climate change are vast and complex, so studies like these are critical to help ensure our nation's responses are rooted in sound science."

The studies will be undertaken by scientists at these universities alongside those from the U.S. Geological survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Forest Service and tribes.

“These are boots-on-the-ground, practical projects to help answer the kinds of questions resource managers are asking about how to respond effectively to, and plan for, climate change,” said Suzette Kimball, USGS acting director. “The selected projects will use the best science to help managers understand changes occurring now and in the future as well as shed light on what management actions are most sensible to take.”

View the full list of funded projects for all eight DOI Climate Science Centers and a map showing the university consortiums involved with each center.

 

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