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  • Nov 25, 2014
  • Comments Off on NOAA Considers a Commercial Big Data Partner
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NOAA_Big_Data_Partnership

NOAA plans to establish a public-private partnership to create a data platform for the agency’s use as well as a means to spur innovation with the increased data exposure.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is considering private-sector partners to help solve its big data dilemma. The agency collects 20-40 terabytes of satellite data per day but only has the resources to release about one-tenth of it.

In the NOAA Big Data Partnership plan, the private sector would help finance the creation of a cloud-based repository for the agency’s data. The architecture includes public access as well as access fees for applications and custom analytical products. The cloud provider would receive a working copy of the data and provide integration and analysis functions.

David E. McClure, Jr., the lead analyst for open government data in the NOAA Office of the CIO, is leading the agency’s Big Data Partnership request for information. McClure is setting the policy foundation for a new business model that would protect the public’s right to access government big data while enabling private-sector innovation to help grow the economy and create jobs.

New York University’s Governance Lab has estimated that NOAA data already have spawned several billion-dollar industries and that these data analysis entities save the United States more than $30 billion annually. This next wave of public-private partnership would elevate the role of private companies as platform providers.

The Big Data Partnership received a strong boost from the Big Data Industry Day that took place at NOAA’s Science Center in Silver Spring, Md. The key will be balancing computer, analytic and storage capacities free to the government with services the public will pay for.

Comments are closed.

NOAA_Big_Data_Partnership

NOAA plans to establish a public-private partnership to create a data platform for the agency’s use as well as a means to spur innovation with the increased data exposure.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is considering private-sector partners to help solve its big data dilemma. The agency collects 20-40 terabytes of satellite data per day but only has the resources to release about one-tenth of it.

In the NOAA Big Data Partnership plan, the private sector would help finance the creation of a cloud-based repository for the agency’s data. The architecture includes public access as well as access fees for applications and custom analytical products. The cloud provider would receive a working copy of the data and provide integration and analysis functions.

David E. McClure, Jr., the lead analyst for open government data in the NOAA Office of the CIO, is leading the agency’s Big Data Partnership request for information. McClure is setting the policy foundation for a new business model that would protect the public’s right to access government big data while enabling private-sector innovation to help grow the economy and create jobs.

New York University’s Governance Lab has estimated that NOAA data already have spawned several billion-dollar industries and that these data analysis entities save the United States more than $30 billion annually. This next wave of public-private partnership would elevate the role of private companies as platform providers.

The Big Data Partnership received a strong boost from the Big Data Industry Day that took place at NOAA’s Science Center in Silver Spring, Md. The key will be balancing computer, analytic and storage capacities free to the government with services the public will pay for.

Comments are closed.