Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Death Valley Flash Flooding
In early August 2022, flash floods soaked Furnace Creek...
Golden Software Enhances Grapher Package with Improved Axes, Plotting, and 3D Functionality
GOLDEN, Colorado – Golden Software, a developer of affordable...
Esri India Marches Ahead with 51% Indian Ownership
New Delhi: Esri India, the country's leading Geographic Information...
Trimble RTX Integrity Validates Positioning Data Accuracy to Support Safety-Critical Applications
Providing Even More Reliable Measurements for Users of Trimble...
Esri Renews NTIS Partnership Supporting White House Priorities with Access to Geographic Data
REDLANDS, Calif.— The Biden administration has prioritized goals relating...
  • Oct 28, 2014
  • Comments Off on Measuring Soil Moisture Via Satellite
  • Uncategorized
  • 4917 Views
SoilMoisture_ESA

The SMOS mission monitors the amount of water held in soil surface layers and the concentration of salt in seawater’s top layer.

The European Space Agency’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission monitors the amount of water held in soil surface layers and the concentration of salt in seawater’s top layer. Soil moisture helps forecasters with floods and droughts, as saturated soil cannot absorb additional water, and the detection of soil water deficiency is closely tied to agricultural yield.

Measuring soil moisture in the root zone during the growing season can be used to gauge plant stress and detect and forecast drought severity. This information is helpful for famine warning systems.

New satellite missions for soil moisture measurements include the European Space Agency’s recently launched Sentinel-1 and NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft, which will be launched no earlier than mid-December 2014. Thermal bands of optical sensors, such as Landsat 8’s bands 10 and 11, also can be used to estimate soil moisture.

Read the full story. 

Comments are closed.

SoilMoisture_ESA

The SMOS mission monitors the amount of water held in soil surface layers and the concentration of salt in seawater’s top layer.

The European Space Agency’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission monitors the amount of water held in soil surface layers and the concentration of salt in seawater’s top layer. Soil moisture helps forecasters with floods and droughts, as saturated soil cannot absorb additional water, and the detection of soil water deficiency is closely tied to agricultural yield.

Measuring soil moisture in the root zone during the growing season can be used to gauge plant stress and detect and forecast drought severity. This information is helpful for famine warning systems.

New satellite missions for soil moisture measurements include the European Space Agency’s recently launched Sentinel-1 and NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) spacecraft, which will be launched no earlier than mid-December 2014. Thermal bands of optical sensors, such as Landsat 8’s bands 10 and 11, also can be used to estimate soil moisture.

Read the full story. 

Comments are closed.