Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Geomni Capturing Aerial Imagery of California Wildfires
Lehi, Utah - Last week, Geomni activated one of...
Prominent Industry Leaders Join Deveron UAS Advisory Board
TORONTO, ONTARIO - Deveron UAS Corp. (CSE:DVR)(CSE:DVR.CN)(CNSX:DVR) ("Deveron" or...
SSL to Provide Access to Space for Small Satellite Constellation
PALO ALTO, CA - SSL, a business unit of Maxar...
Esri Technology Will Help Power the United Nations’ New Global Data Hub
REDLANDS, Calif.- Esri, the global leader in spatial analytics,...
Pix4D is Expanding Globally
Pix4D is adding two senior executives to our leadership...

hurricane

image

October 17, 2017

Hurricane Ophelia’s Temperature

The European Space Agency (ESA) Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite saw the temperature at the top of Hurricane Ophelia on Oct. 15, 2017, as the storm approached the British Isles.

October 2, 2017

NASA Damage Map Aids Puerto Rico Hurricane Response

A NASA-produced map showing areas of eastern Puerto Rico that were likely damaged by Hurricane Maria has been provided to responding agencies, including the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

September 25, 2017

Hurricane Maria

On Sept. 24, 2017, the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided this visible image of Hurricane Maria when it was northeast of Bahamas and east of the Florida east coast.

September 11, 2017

Geocolor Image of Hurricane Irma

The NOAA satellite GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Hurricane Irma passing the eastern end of Cuba at about 8:00 a.m. EDT on Sept. 8, 2017.

September 5, 2017

Hurricane Irma

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP Satellite provided a night-time and infrared look at Hurricane Irma, revealing the power under the clouds. NASA’s GPM also provided a look at the rainfall being generated by the storm.

September 8, 2016

Hurricane Pair Nears Hawaii, Both Miss

The island of Hawaii continued its decades’ long streak of not being directly when Hurricanes Madeline and Lester, which at one point were considered threats for landfall, veered south and north, respectively.