Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Global Aerial Imaging Market – Expected to Reach $3.2 Billion by 2023 – Research and Markets
DUBLIN -The "Global Aerial Imaging Market Analysis (2017-2023)" report...
FLIR Announces FLIR DM166 Thermal Imaging TRMS Multimeter with IGM
WILSONVILLE, Ore. – FLIR announces the FLIR DM166 thermal...
OGC Seeks Public Comment on CDB Multi-Spectral Imagery Extension
The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is seeking public comment...
Save Time and Improve Productivity with the digiVIT Advanced Digital Signal Conditioner from Kaman
Middletown, CT – The Measuring Division of Kaman Precision...
Euronews and Copernicus Present New Programmes that Make Climate Change and Atmosphere Data More Applicable in Daily Lives
Lyon/Reading  - The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service and the...

Click on image to enlarge.

Snow-covered deserts are rare, but that’s exactly what the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on NASA’s Aqua satellite observed as it passed over the Taklimakan Desert in western China on Jan. 2, 2013.
The Taklimakan is one of the world’s largest—and hottest—sandy deserts. Water flowing into the Tarim Basin has no outlet, so over the years sediments have steadily accumulated. In parts of the desert, sand can pile up to 300 meters (roughly 1,000 feet) high. The mountains that enclose the sea of sand—the Tien Shan in the north and the Kunlun Shan in the south—were also covered with what appeared to be a significantly thicker layer of snow in January 2013.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.