Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
U.S. Air Force’s First GPS III Satellite Receives Commands From Next-Generation OCX Ground Control Segment
DENVER – The first advanced GPS III satellite successfully...
Airbus Selected by ESA for Copernicus Data and Information Access Service (DIAS)
Brussels – Airbus has been selected by the European...
Map of the Month: Anholt-GfK Nation Brands Index Study, 2017
This year's Anholt-GfK Nation Brands IndexSM study finds that...
Manufacturer’s Edge CEO Tom Bugnitz Receives Cosmic Contributor Award
(Denver, CO) On December 6, Manufacturer’s Edge (ME) CEO...
Esri Business Partner, GEO Jobe, Announces Release of Admin Tools V 1.0.14 in the ArcGIS Marketplace
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - We're pleased to announce an important...

This map shows the concentration of stratospheric ozone over the Arctic—63 to 90 degrees north—on April 1, 2014. Ozone is typically measured in Dobson Units, the number of molecules required to create a layer of pure ozone 0.01 millimeters thick at a temperature of 0 degrees Celsius and an air pressure of 1 atmosphere—the pressure at Earth’s surface.

This map shows the concentration of stratospheric ozone over the Arctic—63 to 90 degrees north—on April 1, 2014. Ozone is typically measured in Dobson Units, the number of molecules required to create a layer of pure ozone 0.01 millimeters thick at a temperature of 0 degrees Celsius and an air pressure of 1 atmosphere—the pressure at Earth’s surface.

Although Earth’s ozone layer has been depleted during the last four decades by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and similar chemical compounds, the changes are expressed differently at the North and South Poles. While a large ozone hole forms consistently each year over Antarctica, the concentration of Arctic ozone is much more variable. Why such differences?

The differences occur because the weather patterns at the two poles are different. In the far south, the ice-covered continent of Antarctica is surrounded by an ocean. Winds circle the continent in a potent eddy-like band—a polar vortex—that promotes the formation of cold air masses and prevents atmospheric mixing with middle latitudes.

Ozone depletion is depends on the formation of polar stratospheric clouds, which accumulate chlorine and bromine compounds in the cold polar night and then release these ozone-eaters when the sunlight of spring returns.

The North Pole, however, is an ocean surrounded by land that is irregular in shape and altitude. This leads to more atmospheric waves and uneven wind patterns that mix the air more between middle and high latitudes and among different atmospheric layers.

This changes the amount of ozone-depleting substances delivered to and from the Arctic as well as makes temperatures more variable. And while polar vortices do form in the Arctic, they don’t last as long or stay as stationary as their southern counterparts.

Image courtesy of NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.