Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Bluesky Remote Sensing Data Improves Efficiency for WSP Smart Consulting
WSP, the global company providing management and consultancy services...
Presentation Proposals Invited for GIS-Pro & CalGIS 2018 in Palm Springs
URISA is thrilled to partner with the California Geographic Information Association...
Rocket Lab Successfully Reaches Orbit and Deploys Payloads
HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. & AUCKLAND, New Zealand - Rocket...
MDA Selected to Study Alternatives to Protect Canadian Space Assets
RICHMOND, BC - MDA, a Maxar Technologies company (formerly...
Microdrones and ASPRS to Host Workshop Day, February 8th, in Conjunction with the ILMF and ASPRS Conference in Denver, Colorado
ROME, N.Y. - The ASPRS and Microdrones Workshop Day...

GOES-16 captured this view of the moon as it looked above Earth’s surface on Jan. 15, 2017. Like earlier GOES satellites, GOES-16 uses the moon for calibration. (Credit: NOAA/NASA)

GOES-16, the first spacecraft in NOAA’s next-generation of geostationary satellites, sent back to Earth the first high-resolution images from its Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) instrument.

NASA successfully launched GOES-R on Nov. 19, 2016, and it was renamed GOES-16 when it achieved orbit. GOES-16 is now observing the planet from an equatorial view approximately 22,300 miles above Earth’s surface.

The ABI can provide a full-disk image of Earth every 15 minutes, one of the continental United States every five minutes, and has the ability to target regional areas where severe weather, hurricanes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions or other high-impact environmental phenomena are occurring as often as every 30 seconds. The ABI covers Earth five times faster than the current-generation GOES imagers and has four times greater spatial resolution, allowing meteorologists to see smaller features of Earth’s atmosphere and weather systems.

“Seeing these first images from GOES-16 is a foundational moment for the team of scientists and engineers who worked to bring the satellite to launch and are now poised to explore new weather forecasting possibilities with this data and imagery,” said Stephen Volz, Ph.D., NOAA’s assistant administrator for Satellite and Information Services. “The incredibly sharp images are everything we hoped for based on our tests before launch.”

Comments are closed.