Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Image Shows Shanghai, Beijing, Massive Sedimentation
The Copernicus Sentinel-3A looks at an extremely populous portion...
Join GITA in Tampa – March 2019!
GITA is proud to announce along with our local...
CoreLogic and Esri Expand Premium Content Offerings
CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics...
OGC Calls for Participation in Vector Tiles Pilot
The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has released a Call...
Azteca Systems Releases Cityworks 15.3
Cityworks–Azteca Systems announced the release of Cityworks 15.3, the...

LiDAR digitally removes the forest canopy to reveal ancient ruins below, showing that Maya cities such as Tikal were much larger than ground-based research had suggested. (Credit: WILD BLUE MEDIA/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC)

In what’s being hailed as a “major breakthrough” in Maya archaeology, researchers have identified the ruins of more than 60,000 houses, palaces, elevated highways and other human-made features that have been hidden for centuries under the jungles of northern Guatemala.

Using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology, scholars digitally removed the tree canopy from aerial images of the now-unpopulated landscape, revealing the ruins of a sprawling pre-Columbian civilization that was far more complex and interconnected than most Maya specialists had supposed.

Click here to read the original article.

Comments are closed.