Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
iSTAR Pulsar collaborations on show at INTERGEO 2018
Edinburgh, UK – NCTech, a developer of reality imaging...
Navsight Land/Air Solution: Powerful New Inertial Navigation Solution for Surveying Applications
Carrières-sur-seine, France - SBG Systems releases at the Intergeo...
Golden Software Releases Preview of Enhanced Scientific Graphing Package
GOLDEN, Colorado, 15 October 2018 – Golden Software, a...
DroneDeploy Teams Up with REIN’s DroneInsurance.com to Empower Commercial Drone Operators with Seamless Access to Drone Insurance Solutions
SAN FRANCISCO - REIN's DroneInsurance.com, a digital drone insurance portal,...
Phoenix LiDAR Systems Disrupts the LiDAR Landscape Again
Los Angeles, CA — Phoenix LiDAR Systems, LLC., the...

Click on image to enlarge.

This type of fog generally forms when warm, moist air is pushed by winds over a cooler surface. In this case, northeasterly winds pushed a tongue of warm air out over the cooler Yellow Sea. The water is cooler because sunlight warms it less quickly than the land surfaces surrounding it, and because ocean currents off the west coast of Korea tend to bring cold water to the surface.

The fog is generally thickest along the edges. Closer to the middle, the surface has a more textured appearance, indicating possible convection and the possible presence of stratocumulus clouds. These clouds form higher in the atmosphere than fog and don’t affect visibility at the sea surface. An aerosol plume, likely haze emanating from industrial areas in China, is also visible and has caused the lower half of the cloud to appear slightly grayer than the upper half.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.