Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Esri Supports American Association of Geographers’ Successful Introduction of Geospatial Data Act
REDLANDS, Calif.—Esri, the global leader in spatial analytics, today...
WinCan’s ESRI ArcGIS Integration Brings Enhanced GIS Capabilities to Sewer Inspection
PITTSBURGH, PA —When integrated with ESRI’s ArcGIS platform, WinCan...
FARO Leads in Virtual Reality for Construction, Design and Forensics
Lake Mary, FL - FARO® (NASDAQ: FARO), the world’s...
Aerojet Rocketdyne Supports ULA Delta II Launch of Joint Polar Satellite System-1
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Aerojet Rocketdyne, Inc., a subsidiary of...
Daily Planet Imagery Now Available in SpyMeSat Mobile App
GREENBELT, MD – Orbit Logic has reached an agreement...

Flying hundreds of miles above Earth, astronauts aboard the International Space Station photographed Lake Hazlett and Lake Willis in Western Australia's Great Sandy Desert. Hundreds of ephemeral salt lakes are peppered throughout the arid Australian Outback. When occasional floodwaters pour into the lakebeds and then evaporate, they leave salt mineral deposits and create bright, expansive layers that are readily visible from space, as seen in this image taken by the Expedition 52 crew on the station.

The reddish-brown linear sand dunes are slightly higher in elevation (5-10 feet; 1.5-3 meters) and align with the general east to west wind flow in the region. Approximately 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of the lakes lies Lake Mackay, the fourth largest salt lake in Australia.

Photo Credit: NASA

Comments are closed.