Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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This astronaut photograph highlights part of Lake Powell. Looking somewhat like a donut or automobile tire from the vantage point of the International Space Station, the Rincon (image center) is an entrenched and abandoned meander, or loop, of the Colorado River.

Lake Powell started filling in 1963 when the Glen Canyon Dam was completed along the Colorado River in Arizona, and the canyon was flooded. The two branches shown in the image are connected by a bend to the southwest (not shown).

Lake Powell is part of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which extends for more than 300 kilometers (186 miles) along the shoreline and side canyons. The primary intended use of Lake Powell’s water is support for agriculture, with a small portion allocated to urban use in Arizona, Nevada and California.

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