Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Artificial Intelligence has Great Strength in the Interpretation of Geodata
Potsdam, Frankfurt/Main, September 20, 2018. Everyone’s talking about artificial...
Map of the Month: Purchasing Power for Watches and Jewelry, Italy 2017
GfK's Map of the Month for September illustrates the...
Forward to the Moon: Airbus Wins ESA Studies for Future Human Base in Lunar Orbit
Bremen, 20 September 2018 – The European Space Agency...
Bluesky and Getmapping Win UK Gov Contract
Aerial mapping companies Bluesky and Getmapping are pleased to...
Mobile Mapping Market to Surpass $40bn by 2024: Global Market Insights, Inc.
The research report "Mobile Mapping Market Size, By Component...

A false-color image of the Salar de Uyuni from the European Space Agency Proba-V satellite shows wavy patterns visible on the western side, while blue shades on the northern and eastern edges indicate flooded areas. The small rectangular patches to the south of the salt flat indicate a large lithium mining area. (Credit: ESA/Belspo – produced by VITO)

Covering 10,500 square kilometers, Bolivia’s Salar de Uyuni is the world’s largest salt plain. Located in the highlands of southwestern Bolivia at an altitude of 3,650 meters, Salar de Uyuni is extremely flat, varying less than 1 meter across its expanse. It’s so flat that it’s often used to calibrate laser and radar altimeters on satellites.

The salt plains were formed 30,000-40,000 years ago as a result of transformations between several prehistoric lakes. The crusty top layer, several meters thick in places, lies on a brine rich in lithium (containing 50-70 percent of the world’s reserves), potassium and magnesium.

Comments are closed.