Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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CleanSpace One closes in on a discarded cubesat satellite in an EPFL illustration.

A 10-million-franc ($11 million) satellite called CleanSpace One is being built by the Swiss Space Center at the Swiss Federal Institute for Technology in Lausanne. Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) said its launch would come within three to five years. Its first tasks are to grab two Swiss satellites launched in 2009 and 2010.

"It has become essential to be aware of the existence of this debris and the risks that are run by its proliferation," said Claude Nicollier, an astronaut and EPFL professor.

Building the satellite means developing new technology to address three big problems, scientists say. The first hurdle has to do with trajectory: The satellite has to be able to adjust its path to match that of its target. EPFL said its labs are looking into a new ultra-compact motor that can do this.

Next, the satellite has to be grab hold of and stabilize the debris at high speeds. Scientists are studying how plants and animals grip things as a model for what would be used.

And, finally, CleanSpace One has to be able to take the debris, or unwanted satellites, back into Earth’s atmosphere, where they will burn on re-entry.

Swiss Space Center’s director, Volker Gass, said it hopes to someday "offer and sell a whole family of ready-made systems, designed as sustainably as possible, that are able to de-orbit several different kinds of satellites."

Source: Daily Mail

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