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February 19, 2014
South Australia Police Purchase Surveillance UASs

Operators of the South Australia Police’s new remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) must be certified and licensed by the country’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority. RPAs can be fitted with a variety of cameras, including still, video and infrared.

South Australia Police recently added two unmanned aircraft systems (UASs)—or remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) as they’re called in Australia—to its surveillance tool kit. The RPAs are small, easily maneuverable and can be deployed quickly to provide quality aerial photography and vision to police on the ground.

“These devices will be useful to help gather intelligence during emergencies and high-risk incidents,” Assistant Commissioner (Crime) Paul Dickson said. “This could include flying over property where a siege is taking place to identify tactical options for police or search for weapons on rooftops, drug crops or even missing people.”

According to Dickson, the units can also be used to rapidly inspect towers, infrastructure or other property searching for explosives or looking for damage after a fire.

“Examples of where the technology can be used to capture photographs and vision at large crime scenes are endless,” he said. “This technology can get to areas where conventional aircraft can’t, because it is either too dangerous or too costly.”

Image courtesy of Aerialtronics.

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