Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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An Aqua image was captured at 12:35 local time on April 23, 2014.

A wall of dust was barreling across northern China on April 23, 2014. Images collected by NASA’s Aqua and Terra satellites two hours apart show how fast the dust advanced.

A Terra image was captured at 2:35 p.m. local time on April 23, 2014.

Dust storms are common in the deserts of northern China, but they peak during the spring when large storms and weather fronts move in from Siberia. In this case, a large front appears to be pushing east across Asia, kicking up dust ahead of it. On the ground, the dust brought visibility down to less than 50 meters (160 feet), veiling parts of northwest China in yellow haze.

Image courtesy of NASA.

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