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This representation of MH370’s flight path probability shows autopilot dynamics (red) and data error optimization (green). Red flight paths are most probable paths from the two types of analysis, according to the latest Australian Transport Safety Bureau report.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) has been helping to find Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 ever since it was determined the aircraft was within the Australian search and rescue zone in the southern part of the Indian Ocean. While ongoing seafloor mapping efforts are under way, further analysis of radar data and subsequent satellite communication (SATCOM) system signaling messages have helped refine the search area.

The analysis has been undertaken by a team from the United Kingdom, United States, Australia and Malaysia working independently and collaboratively. Experts on the team are from the U.K.’s Air Accidents Investigations Branch, Malaysia’s Department of Civil Aviation and the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board as well as commercial representatives from Boeing, Inmarsat and Thales.

The team has been trying to piece together possible flight paths from data from a communications satellite system (Inmarsat), along with Boeing aircraft performance data, the last radar contact data and information recorded by a satellite ground station. Information from two unanswered ground-to-air telephone calls also has been logged for analysis.

A June 2014 report avoided discussing the possibility of a southern turn, given an overwhelming number of possible maneuvers. The latest report, released Oct. 8, 2014, reveals greater confidence with further refinements to the SATCOM system model.

The full MH370 Flight Path Analysis Update report is online (PDF). 

Image source: Flight path reconstruction group, Google Earth

Comments are closed.

MH370_Search_Labels

This representation of MH370’s flight path probability shows autopilot dynamics (red) and data error optimization (green). Red flight paths are most probable paths from the two types of analysis, according to the latest Australian Transport Safety Bureau report.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) has been helping to find Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 ever since it was determined the aircraft was within the Australian search and rescue zone in the southern part of the Indian Ocean. While ongoing seafloor mapping efforts are under way, further analysis of radar data and subsequent satellite communication (SATCOM) system signaling messages have helped refine the search area.

The analysis has been undertaken by a team from the United Kingdom, United States, Australia and Malaysia working independently and collaboratively. Experts on the team are from the U.K.’s Air Accidents Investigations Branch, Malaysia’s Department of Civil Aviation and the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board as well as commercial representatives from Boeing, Inmarsat and Thales.

The team has been trying to piece together possible flight paths from data from a communications satellite system (Inmarsat), along with Boeing aircraft performance data, the last radar contact data and information recorded by a satellite ground station. Information from two unanswered ground-to-air telephone calls also has been logged for analysis.

A June 2014 report avoided discussing the possibility of a southern turn, given an overwhelming number of possible maneuvers. The latest report, released Oct. 8, 2014, reveals greater confidence with further refinements to the SATCOM system model.

The full MH370 Flight Path Analysis Update report is online (PDF). 

Image source: Flight path reconstruction group, Google Earth

Comments are closed.