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GlobalFishingWatch

Global Fishing Watch combines millions of data points from the AIS network to visualize and track fishing activity worldwide.

Global Fishing Watch provides a global view of commercial fishing. The new platform was born from a partnership among Oceana, Skytruth and Google, making its debut at the 2014 IUCN World Parks Congress in Sydney, Australia.

“Global Fishing Watch uses big data and massive computing capacity to transform fisheries management by exposing illegal practices and creating a deterrent to breaking the law,” says Oceana CEO Andrew Sharpless. “This will allow policies like catch limits and habitat protection measures to work to bring back fishery abundance and help feed our growing populations.”

The system gathers satellite data from the Automatic Identification System (AIS) network, which broadcasts a vessel’s location and uses Google’s considerable computing power to analyze and display patterns of fishing vessels. The AIS system was designed for safety to help avoid collisions at sea, but the information is also helpful to denote each vessel’s behavior such as location, speed and direction.

“So much of what happens out on the high seas is invisible, and that has been a huge barrier to understanding and showing the world what’s at stake for the ocean,” said John Amos, SkyTruth’s president and founder. “But now, satellite data is allowing us to make human interaction with the ocean more transparent than ever before. Fishermen can show how they are doing their part to fish sustainably, we can motivate citizens to watch the places they care about, and we can all work together to restore a thriving ocean.”

Oceana provides a detailed overview of Global Fishing Watch and its many uses in a new report.

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GlobalFishingWatch

Global Fishing Watch combines millions of data points from the AIS network to visualize and track fishing activity worldwide.

Global Fishing Watch provides a global view of commercial fishing. The new platform was born from a partnership among Oceana, Skytruth and Google, making its debut at the 2014 IUCN World Parks Congress in Sydney, Australia.

“Global Fishing Watch uses big data and massive computing capacity to transform fisheries management by exposing illegal practices and creating a deterrent to breaking the law,” says Oceana CEO Andrew Sharpless. “This will allow policies like catch limits and habitat protection measures to work to bring back fishery abundance and help feed our growing populations.”

The system gathers satellite data from the Automatic Identification System (AIS) network, which broadcasts a vessel’s location and uses Google’s considerable computing power to analyze and display patterns of fishing vessels. The AIS system was designed for safety to help avoid collisions at sea, but the information is also helpful to denote each vessel’s behavior such as location, speed and direction.

“So much of what happens out on the high seas is invisible, and that has been a huge barrier to understanding and showing the world what’s at stake for the ocean,” said John Amos, SkyTruth’s president and founder. “But now, satellite data is allowing us to make human interaction with the ocean more transparent than ever before. Fishermen can show how they are doing their part to fish sustainably, we can motivate citizens to watch the places they care about, and we can all work together to restore a thriving ocean.”

Oceana provides a detailed overview of Global Fishing Watch and its many uses in a new report.

Comments are closed.