Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
U.S. Air Force’s First GPS III Satellite Receives Commands From Next-Generation OCX Ground Control Segment
DENVER – The first advanced GPS III satellite successfully...
Airbus Selected by ESA for Copernicus Data and Information Access Service (DIAS)
Brussels – Airbus has been selected by the European...
Map of the Month: Anholt-GfK Nation Brands Index Study, 2017
This year's Anholt-GfK Nation Brands IndexSM study finds that...
Manufacturer’s Edge CEO Tom Bugnitz Receives Cosmic Contributor Award
(Denver, CO) On December 6, Manufacturer’s Edge (ME) CEO...
Esri Business Partner, GEO Jobe, Announces Release of Admin Tools V 1.0.14 in the ArcGIS Marketplace
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - We're pleased to announce an important...

Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS),

The ISS LIS instrument will be installed on the International Space Station to help detect lightning occurrences in Earth’s tropical regions.

Researchers at the University of Alabama in Huntsville recently shipped a Lightning Imaging Sensor to the Johnson Space Center in Texas in anticipation of its planned flight to the International Space Station (ISS) in March 2016.

Researchers at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) recently shipped a Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) to the Johnson Space Center in Texas in anticipation of its planned flight to the International Space Station (ISS) in March 2016. The instrument, known as ISS LIS, is used to detect the distribution and variability of total cloud-to-cloud, intracloud and cloud-to-ground lightning that occurs in tropical regions of the globe.

“The ISS LIS will be integrated onto the Space Test Program H5 spacecraft at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, where it will undergo testing through August 2015,” says Mike Stewart, a UAH Earth Systems Science Center principal research engineer. “The ISS LIS will be one of 10 instruments on the H5.”

The ISS LIS is a backup instrument to one launched in November 1997 aboard NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), which is still in operation. The ISS vantage point is on a higher orbital plane, so it will extend observations to higher latitudes.

 

Comments are closed.