Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Germans’ Purchasing Power Climbs 2.8 Percent in 2018
Bruchsal, Germany, December 12, 2017 – Germans’ 2018 purchasing...
Tersus Introduces High-end GNSS Kits with Centimeter-accurate GNSS OEM RTK Boards
Tersus GNSS Inc. (“Tersus”), a leading GNSS positioning solution...
SSL to Provide Access to Space for Small Satellite Constellation
PALO ALTO, Calif. - SSL, a business unit of...
Global Aerial Imaging Market – Expected to Reach $3.2 Billion by 2023 – Research and Markets
DUBLIN -The "Global Aerial Imaging Market Analysis (2017-2023)" report...
FLIR Announces FLIR DM166 Thermal Imaging TRMS Multimeter with IGM
WILSONVILLE, Ore. – FLIR announces the FLIR DM166 thermal...

These plots show some of the first data taken by OCO-2 as it flew over Papua-New Guinea on Aug. 6, 2014. Each plot shows three different spectra, or wavelengths, observed by the satellite’s spectrometers. When displayed as an image, the spectra appear like bar codes. The dark lines indicate absorption by molecular oxygen or carbon dioxide.

These plots show some of the first data taken by OCO-2 as it flew over Papua-New Guinea on Aug. 6, 2014. Each plot shows three different spectra, or wavelengths, observed by the satellite’s spectrometers. When displayed as an image, the spectra appear like bar codes. The dark lines indicate absorption by molecular oxygen or carbon dioxide.

Just a little more than a month after it was launched, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite has been maneuvered into its final orbit and has produced its first science data.

As NASA’s first spacecraft dedicated to studying atmospheric carbon dioxide, OCO-2 will produce the most detailed picture to date of the manmade and natural sources of carbon dioxide as well as their natural “sinks”—places on Earth’s surface where carbon dioxide is removed from the atmosphere. The satellite will study how these sources and sinks are distributed around the globe and how they change over time.

Image courtesy of NASA.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.