Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Artificial Intelligence has Great Strength in the Interpretation of Geodata
Potsdam, Frankfurt/Main, September 20, 2018. Everyone’s talking about artificial...
Map of the Month: Purchasing Power for Watches and Jewelry, Italy 2017
GfK's Map of the Month for September illustrates the...
Forward to the Moon: Airbus Wins ESA Studies for Future Human Base in Lunar Orbit
Bremen, 20 September 2018 – The European Space Agency...
Bluesky and Getmapping Win UK Gov Contract
Aerial mapping companies Bluesky and Getmapping are pleased to...
Mobile Mapping Market to Surpass $40bn by 2024: Global Market Insights, Inc.
The research report "Mobile Mapping Market Size, By Component...

An MQ-1 Predator instructor with the California Air National Guard remotely controls a drone and could one day control multiple drones at once if a new Pentagon project comes to fruition.

The U.S. military has dozens of different drones in its arsenal, each with its unique controller, but one Pentagon office thinks that’s archaic and wants controls that can handle an entire fleet at once.

Inside the Pentagon’s Acquisition, Technology and Logistics directorate, a team is working on ways to operate different types of drones with a single controller. It’s a big technical challenge—one that’s failed in the past, because the different manufacturers of different drones each have proprietary control software.

But the official in charge of the effort envisions a new drone software architecture that’s agnostic about what kind of drone it controls and allows human controllers to think in terms of drone fleets rather than individual robots, including fleets comprising different kinds of drones. That would enable a dramatic expansion of the possibilities of drone warfare.

Step one is to get a kind of universal remote for the drones—that is, a controller that can operate, say, an armed Predator and a robotic spy. It’s a major challenge. The first such company is California-based DreamHammer, which has developed software that can operate numerous robots from the same tablet or laptop.

Image courtesy of the National Guard Bureau.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.