Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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TippedCar

An image showing a tipped car in Krefeld, Germany, illustrates the resolution and discovery possible with today’s satellite imagery.

Two satellite imaging specialists from University College London recently launched Air & Space Evidence Ltd., the world’s first space detective agency. The company provides expert evidence for the legal, law enforcement, auditing and insurance sectors through the use of aerial photography, radar satellite imagery, other satellite Earth observations and unmanned aircraft system imagery.

The team sites the number of available data sources from different sensors, their improved accuracy and the availability of near real-time data as the impetus for making the leap toward setting up their own agency. They discuss the cost advantages of a remote sensing approach vs. traditional ground techniques as well as their ability to conduct ongoing monitoring.

The advantages are detailed on the company’s website:

“Earth observation technologies can allow regular and unprecedented access to information concerning nearly any location on Earth, at almost any time, without the technology coming into direct contact with the object or area or the need to gain permissions to fly over a country or area to collect aerial photography. This offers new opportunities for those wishing to observe activities in places that are difficult to monitor by conventional methods, such as monitoring environmental legislation in remote areas, or checking on human rights abuses within countries at war. There are also significant opportunities available to look back in time, and archives of Earth observation information can often provide historical evidence that would be otherwise unavailable.”

The team compiled a lot of experience working on interdisciplinary projects in the academic setting and received an increasing number of phone calls from those in the law enforcement arena. In addition to compiling evidence for investigation and enforcement, the agency aims to educate and assist, including sourcing imagery, validating imagery authenticity, and providing data analysis and interpretation services.

Image source: Air & Space Evidence Ltd.

Comments are closed.

TippedCar

An image showing a tipped car in Krefeld, Germany, illustrates the resolution and discovery possible with today’s satellite imagery.

Two satellite imaging specialists from University College London recently launched Air & Space Evidence Ltd., the world’s first space detective agency. The company provides expert evidence for the legal, law enforcement, auditing and insurance sectors through the use of aerial photography, radar satellite imagery, other satellite Earth observations and unmanned aircraft system imagery.

The team sites the number of available data sources from different sensors, their improved accuracy and the availability of near real-time data as the impetus for making the leap toward setting up their own agency. They discuss the cost advantages of a remote sensing approach vs. traditional ground techniques as well as their ability to conduct ongoing monitoring.

The advantages are detailed on the company’s website:

“Earth observation technologies can allow regular and unprecedented access to information concerning nearly any location on Earth, at almost any time, without the technology coming into direct contact with the object or area or the need to gain permissions to fly over a country or area to collect aerial photography. This offers new opportunities for those wishing to observe activities in places that are difficult to monitor by conventional methods, such as monitoring environmental legislation in remote areas, or checking on human rights abuses within countries at war. There are also significant opportunities available to look back in time, and archives of Earth observation information can often provide historical evidence that would be otherwise unavailable.”

The team compiled a lot of experience working on interdisciplinary projects in the academic setting and received an increasing number of phone calls from those in the law enforcement arena. In addition to compiling evidence for investigation and enforcement, the agency aims to educate and assist, including sourcing imagery, validating imagery authenticity, and providing data analysis and interpretation services.

Image source: Air & Space Evidence Ltd.

Comments are closed.