Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
The 2018 Commercial UAV Expo, Incorporating Drone World Expo, to be Held in October in Las Vegas
LAS VEGAS, NV - Following the acquisition of Drone...
Martin Instrument and Western Data Systems (WDS) Announce Merger to Create AllTerra Central
AUSTIN, Texas - Martin Instrument and Western Data Systems...
Drone Delivery Canada to Expand Testing Program to The United States of America
TORONTO - Drone Delivery Canada 'DDC or the Company'...
Alteryx Announces Premier Partners: Deliverers of Excellence in Data Science and Analytics
IRVINE, Calif.- Alteryx, Inc. (NYSE: AYX), revolutionizing business through data...
thinkWhere Takes a Global View with theMapCloud Platform
Scottish Geographic Information Systems (GIS) company thinkWhere is setting...

Firecast’s new mobile application is being tested in Madagascar’s Ambohitantely, a forested reserve that can be seen in this image acquired by the Operational Land Imager on the Landsat 8 satellite. (Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Jesse Allen, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey.)

Firecast’s new mobile application is being tested in Madagascar’s Ambohitantely, a forested reserve that can be seen in this image acquired by the Operational Land Imager on the Landsat 8 satellite. (Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Jesse Allen, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey.)

Karyn Tabor wants to change the way people in remote areas manage wildfires. In Madagascar, for example, the current approach involves patrolling protected areas on foot to locate and extinguish fires before they grow larger. In June 2016, Tabor and colleagues introduced technology that could make fire detection easier.

The project is called Firecast—a system to monitor and deliver alerts for active fires, fire risk, and deforestation in the tropics. The project’s web site and mobile application bring NASA satellite data to fire managers in areas that have traditionally relied on ground-based monitoring. Users can view maps of active fires, download daily fire risk forecasts, read reports of local fire activity, and see current activity in context with historical data.

“Our niche is packaging and delivering NASA data to make it accessible to people who need the information for day-to-day conservation decisions,” said Tabor, a scientist at Conservation International and principal investigator of the project, which is partly funded by NASA’s applied sciences program.

 

Comments are closed.