Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
UNITAR-UNOSAT and Radiant.Earth Partner for Greater Impact from Earth Observations
The United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR),...
Insitu Announces High Accuracy Photogrammetry Payload for Broad Aerial Survey
COSTA MESA, Calif. - Insitu today announced the successful integration...
PDF3D V2.14 Release Meets Demands of Drones, Scanners and 3D Design Applications
PDF3D, leaders in 3D PDF conversion software, have today...
MangoMap Integrates with Maptiks Analytics Maptiks Integrates Web Map Analytics with MangoMap
Prince George, BC: Maptiks and MangoMap have announced the...
Big Success for First Pan-European Drone Conference and Trade Fair
Brussels – From 20-22 June, the SQUARE Brussels Exhibition...

An Earth-orbiting radar can’t see the ocean floor, but it can measure ocean-surface height variations induced by the ocean floor’s topography. When interesting features are discovered in satellite measurements, they later can be surveyed in fine detail by ships.

CryoSat was designed to measure Arctic sea-ice thickness, but high-resolution mapping of ocean-floor topography now is being added to the ice mission’s repertoire.

The main objective of the polar-orbiting CryoSat is to measure the thickness of polar sea ice and monitor changes in the ice sheets that blanket Greenland and Antarctica. But the satellite’s radar altimeter can detect tiny variations in the height of the ice as well as measure sea level.

The topography of the ocean surface mimics the rises and dips of the ocean floor due to the gravitational pull. Areas of greater mass, such as underwater mountains, have a stronger pull, attracting more water and producing a minor increase in ocean-surface height. Therefore, instruments that measure sea-surface height incidentally map the ocean floor in previously uncharted areas.

Read the full story.

Image courtesy of Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

 

Comments are closed.