Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Artificial Intelligence has Great Strength in the Interpretation of Geodata
Potsdam, Frankfurt/Main, September 20, 2018. Everyone’s talking about artificial...
Map of the Month: Purchasing Power for Watches and Jewelry, Italy 2017
GfK's Map of the Month for September illustrates the...
Forward to the Moon: Airbus Wins ESA Studies for Future Human Base in Lunar Orbit
Bremen, 20 September 2018 – The European Space Agency...
Bluesky and Getmapping Win UK Gov Contract
Aerial mapping companies Bluesky and Getmapping are pleased to...
Mobile Mapping Market to Surpass $40bn by 2024: Global Market Insights, Inc.
The research report "Mobile Mapping Market Size, By Component...

An Earth-orbiting radar can’t see the ocean floor, but it can measure ocean-surface height variations induced by the ocean floor’s topography. When interesting features are discovered in satellite measurements, they later can be surveyed in fine detail by ships.

CryoSat was designed to measure Arctic sea-ice thickness, but high-resolution mapping of ocean-floor topography now is being added to the ice mission’s repertoire.

The main objective of the polar-orbiting CryoSat is to measure the thickness of polar sea ice and monitor changes in the ice sheets that blanket Greenland and Antarctica. But the satellite’s radar altimeter can detect tiny variations in the height of the ice as well as measure sea level.

The topography of the ocean surface mimics the rises and dips of the ocean floor due to the gravitational pull. Areas of greater mass, such as underwater mountains, have a stronger pull, attracting more water and producing a minor increase in ocean-surface height. Therefore, instruments that measure sea-surface height incidentally map the ocean floor in previously uncharted areas.

Read the full story.

Image courtesy of Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

 

Comments are closed.