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The JLENS radar tracking system has successfully targeted small speedboats, cars, trucks, trains, manned and unmanned aircraft, and land- and maritime-attack cruise missiles.

The U.S. Army has been testing tethered airships for airspace surveillance around the nation’s capital. The Raytheon-built Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System (JLENS) has been tethered at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland, where its 24/7 monitoring capacity provides a means to detect and track automobiles, aircraft or incoming missiles (including accurately estimating launch sites).

JLENS is comprised of two 243-foot-long blimps, with one providing 360-degree surveillance with a range of 360 miles, and the other focused on tracking. The aircraft float at 10,000 feet for durations of 30 days. They are tethered to the ground with Kevlar cables that also include power and fiber-optic cables for energy and communications.

The technical term for these unpowered craft is aerostat, although more readily recognized as a blimp, with the distinction being that it's tethered. The system is touted for its low cost, saving significantly on fuel and manpower over traditional fixed-wing aircraft.

Read more about JLENS here

Comments are closed.

Raytheon_jlens

The JLENS radar tracking system has successfully targeted small speedboats, cars, trucks, trains, manned and unmanned aircraft, and land- and maritime-attack cruise missiles.

The U.S. Army has been testing tethered airships for airspace surveillance around the nation’s capital. The Raytheon-built Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System (JLENS) has been tethered at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland, where its 24/7 monitoring capacity provides a means to detect and track automobiles, aircraft or incoming missiles (including accurately estimating launch sites).

JLENS is comprised of two 243-foot-long blimps, with one providing 360-degree surveillance with a range of 360 miles, and the other focused on tracking. The aircraft float at 10,000 feet for durations of 30 days. They are tethered to the ground with Kevlar cables that also include power and fiber-optic cables for energy and communications.

The technical term for these unpowered craft is aerostat, although more readily recognized as a blimp, with the distinction being that it's tethered. The system is touted for its low cost, saving significantly on fuel and manpower over traditional fixed-wing aircraft.

Read more about JLENS here

Comments are closed.