Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
Breaking News
Nearly 1,000 Local Government and Public Safety Leaders Gather for Innovation-Themed Superion SPARK Customer Summit 2018
LAKE MARY, Fla.- Superion, an industry leader in public...
Vricon’s Disruptive 3D GEOINT Technology Fuels Company Growth
McLean, VA - Vricon, a global leader in 3D...
Ball Aerospace Remote Sensing Technology Detects Methane Leaks During Mobile Monitoring Challenge
BOULDER, Colo. - Ball Aerospace demonstrated its methane remote sensing...
Maxar Settles Appraisal Litigation with the Former Holders of Series A Preferred Stock of DigitalGlobe
WESTMINSTER, CO and VANCOUVER - Maxar Technologies Ltd. ("Maxar" or...
Contex Introduces the Market’s Widest and Fastest CCD Scanner
Alleroed, Denmark — Contex, the world leader in large...

Sheriff Ahern says local public safety agencies must take advantage of innovation that’s out there, calling it a “no brainer.”

Alameda County Sheriff Greg Ahern first tested an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) about a year ago. Now he’s looking into buying one, which would be a first for California law enforcement.

Armed with live-video-feeding capabilities and different features, like infrared devices, the drones can cost $50,000 to $100,000 dollars or more. There are several different models, but the one Ahern is considering weighs four pounds and spans four feet. He says the drones get a birds-eye view that most tactical officers on the ground would never get, sometimes endangering their lives.

A recent demonstration at the county’s Office of Emergency Services building featured a man standing in the shadows on a rooftop, with three possible explosives clearly in his reach. The drone saw everything; the officers on the ground could not.

According to Ahern, his office would only use drones during emergencies, from a high-speed or high-risk chase to search-and-rescue operations in disasters as well as proactive policing measures like catching marijuana grown in fields on public lands and in grow houses.

Image courtesy of NBC Bay Area.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.