Earth Imaging Journal: Remote Sensing, Satellite Images, Satellite Imagery
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AAAS_Aleppo

Between Dec. 6, 2011, and July 14, 2014, Aleppo's Ministry of Justice building was heavily damaged (red arrow), as was the Khusriwiye Mosque (green arrow). The Carlton Citadel Hotel (blue arrow) was completely destroyed.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is assessing the impact of Syria’s conflict on World Heritage Sites using satellite imagery. The task is being undertaken by the association’s Geospatial Technologies and Human Rights Project, which addresses human rights issues.

The six World Heritage sites in Syria include the Ancient City of Aleppo, the Ancient City of Bosra, the Ancient City of Damascus, the Ancient Site of Palmyra, the Ancient Cities of Northern Syria, Crac des Chevaliers and Qal’at Salah El-Din. Analysis of high-resolution satellite imagery shows that five of the six Syrian World Heritage sites have sustained visible damage since the start of the conflict, with the Ancient City of Damascus being the only site without visible damage.

The AAAS investigation is ongoing, with plans to further document and verify timelines of damage with further imagery and assessment. The website for the project contains detailed before and after imagery of the conflict zones as well as details on methodology in an accompanying report.

Image courtesy of DigitalGlobe, with analysis by AAAS.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.

AAAS_Aleppo

Between Dec. 6, 2011, and July 14, 2014, Aleppo's Ministry of Justice building was heavily damaged (red arrow), as was the Khusriwiye Mosque (green arrow). The Carlton Citadel Hotel (blue arrow) was completely destroyed.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is assessing the impact of Syria’s conflict on World Heritage Sites using satellite imagery. The task is being undertaken by the association’s Geospatial Technologies and Human Rights Project, which addresses human rights issues.

The six World Heritage sites in Syria include the Ancient City of Aleppo, the Ancient City of Bosra, the Ancient City of Damascus, the Ancient Site of Palmyra, the Ancient Cities of Northern Syria, Crac des Chevaliers and Qal’at Salah El-Din. Analysis of high-resolution satellite imagery shows that five of the six Syrian World Heritage sites have sustained visible damage since the start of the conflict, with the Ancient City of Damascus being the only site without visible damage.

The AAAS investigation is ongoing, with plans to further document and verify timelines of damage with further imagery and assessment. The website for the project contains detailed before and after imagery of the conflict zones as well as details on methodology in an accompanying report.

Image courtesy of DigitalGlobe, with analysis by AAAS.

Read the full story.

Comments are closed.